Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Grab your Dinner Plate the Dahlias are Served

As a cut flower, dahlias only last for 4-5 days at best. They require a lot of water in a clean, steralized vase. Their stems are hollow, which means it’s easy to clog them with bacteria if the water is not clean. It’s best to change out their water daily. They’ll usually last longer if you can use them in a floating vase– because then they are able to take in as much water as possible, and don’t have to waste energy getting water to their abundant foliage.

Anemone flowered dahlias have blooms with one or more outer rings of generally flattened florets surrounding a dense group of tubular florets, which are longer than the disc florets of single dahlias. The tubular florets of anemone-flowered dahlias are coloured like the ray florets, and no central disc is shown.

Ball dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The blooms are spherical or slightly flattened on the face. The florets are blunt or rounded at their tips and are involute for more than half their length.

Cactus dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The florets are narrow, pointed and fully revolute for more than one half of their length. They may be straight or distinctly incurving so that the tips point towards the front of the bloom.

Semi-cactus dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The florets are broad at their bases and pointed at their tips. The centre shall be full and the undeveloped florets immediately round the centre may be flat. Fully developed florets should be revolute for more than one quarter of their length, but not more than half their length.

Fimbriated dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The florets are forked or split into two or more points – the splits shoul ideally show no barbing. Fimbriation is found within most classification groups of the dahlia.

Single Orchid. A bloom with a single row of florets showing the central disc of the bloom, the florets involute showing the reverse colour on the front of the bloom for ideally at least one third of the floret from the tip.

Double Orchid. A fully double blooms showing no central disc, flrets involute showing the reverse colour on the front of the bloom for ideally at least ont third of the floret from the tip.

Decorative dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The florets are broad and are essentially flat, being neither markedly involute or revolute. In some cultivars the florets may be recurved, while in others ( informal ), they may be slightly twisted.

Collerette dahlias have blooms with a single outer ring of ray florets, surrounding a circular central disc of tubular disc florets. The outer parts of the ray florets are usually flat and may overlap. The inner parts are modified and form a collar of petaloids. This collar does not normally exceed half the length of the outer parts and is often , though not necessarily, of contrasting colour.

Single dahlias have blooms with a single outer ring of ray florets, which may overlap, surrounding a circular central disc of tubular disc florets

Waterlily Dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The blooms are shallow and saucer shaped, the depth being less than half the diameter. Florets are invurving and their ends may be rounded or pointed and ideally should have between five and seven rows of florets fully open for exhibition.

Pompom dahlias have fully double blooms showing no central disc. The blooms are spherical, with full, even centres. The florets are rounded at their tips and are involute for the whole of their length. The blooms are born directly on top of their stems.

Dwarf dahlias have a growing height of lower than 40 cm in average growing conditions and come in a full range of bloom types. These dahlias are recommended for tub and pot culture, and can also be used for edging.

Border dahlias generally have a growing height of between 40-75 cm in height in average growing conditions and comne in a full range of bloom types.

Source: http://www.nzdahliasociety.50megs.com/index.html


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